Sermons

Current Series

Learning to See Again

This is How We Live - IV
Following THE Way Means Living THIS Way

Before the term “Christian” began to proliferate with regard to those who followed the example of Jesus, the early church simply referred to each other as followers of “the way.” They had seen the way Jesus lived, and they sought to follow his example by living according to the same “way.” As we celebrate our 40th anniversary this year at UBC, and as we practice 40 ways of living the Christian life, we thought we would take 40 weeks to reconsider exactly what living the Christian life should look like. As a starting point for our investigation, we’ll consider the original covenant instructions given to God’s people, the Ten Commandments, and we’ll observe how those ten words served as principles of living for God’s people from the wilderness all the way to the early church and beyond. Far from being “old” laws that no longer apply to the church, we will see that the Commandments represent the simplest explanation of what it means to love God and love your neighbor, as well as a broad enough explanation to potentially speak to every area of the Christian’s life. While specific applications change with time and place, the principles themselves clearly define what it means to follow “the way.” This is what it means to live the Christian life.

This is How We Live - III
Following THE Way Means Living THIS Way

Before the term “Christian” began to proliferate with regard to those who followed the example of Jesus, the early church simply referred to each other as followers of “the way.” They had seen the way Jesus lived, and they sought to follow his example by living according to the same “way.” As we celebrate our 40th anniversary this year at UBC, and as we practice 40 ways of living the Christian life, we thought we would take 40 weeks to reconsider exactly what living the Christian life should look like. As a starting point for our investigation, we’ll consider the original covenant instructions given to God’s people, the Ten Commandments, and we’ll observe how those ten words served as principles of living for God’s people from the wilderness all the way to the early church and beyond. Far from being “old” laws that no longer apply to the church, we will see that the Commandments represent the simplest explanation of what it means to love God and love your neighbor, as well as a broad enough explanation to potentially speak to every area of the Christian’s life. While specific applications change with time and place, the principles themselves clearly define what it means to follow “the way.” This is what it means to live the Christian life.

This is How We Live - II
Following THE Way Means Living THIS Way

Before the term “Christian” began to proliferate with regard to those who followed the example of Jesus, the early church simply referred to each other as followers of “the way.” They had seen the way Jesus lived, and they sought to follow his example by living according to the same “way.” As we celebrate our 40th anniversary this year at UBC, and as we practice 40 ways of living the Christian life, we thought we would take 40 weeks to reconsider exactly what living the Christian life should look like. As a starting point for our investigation, we’ll consider the original covenant instructions given to God’s people, the Ten Commandments, and we’ll observe how those ten words served as principles of living for God’s people from the wilderness all the way to the early church and beyond. Far from being “old” laws that no longer apply to the church, we will see that the Commandments represent the simplest explanation of what it means to love God and love your neighbor, as well as a broad enough explanation to potentially speak to every area of the Christian’s life. While specific applications change with time and place, the principles themselves clearly define what it means to follow “the way.” This is what it means to live the Christian life.

This is How We Live - I
Following THE Way Means Living THIS Way

Before the term “Christian” began to proliferate with regard to those who followed the example of Jesus, the early church simply referred to each other as followers of “the way.” They had seen the way Jesus lived, and they sought to follow his example by living according to the same “way.” As we celebrate our 40th anniversary this year at UBC, and as we practice 40 ways of living the Christian life, we thought we would take 40 weeks to reconsider exactly what living the Christian life should look like. As a starting point for our investigation, we’ll consider the original covenant instructions given to God’s people, the Ten Commandments, and we’ll observe how those ten words served as principles of living for God’s people from the wilderness all the way to the early church and beyond. Far from being “old” laws that no longer apply to the church, we will see that the Commandments represent the simplest explanation of what it means to love God and love your neighbor, as well as a broad enough explanation to potentially speak to every area of the Christian’s life. While specific applications change with time and place, the principles themselves clearly define what it means to follow “the way.” This is what it means to live the Christian life.

Celebration
Celebrating the Life and Work We Share

The number 40 is an important and symbolic one in the Bible. It represents a perfect or complete span of earthly time. The 40 days of rain in the time of Noah was complete. God needed no more and no less to accomplish his purpose. The 40 years of wandering in the wilderness following the Exodus? Same story. Forty days that Moses was Mt. Sinai with God, and that the spies scouted out the land of Canaan, and that Goliath mocked the Israelites prior to David’s arrival, all carry the same message. Our God is a God of history. He is the God over time. Forty years of ministry in the Bay Area by UBC is a substantial accomplishment, and one worthy of celebrating. In doing so we give constant praise and glorification to our Lord who has filled this church and its work over that time. And in celebrating the past 40 years, we also take time to consider and to dream about the next 40, and what our God might have in store for the church who walks humbly with him and seeks to build his kingdom in obedience and faithfulness.

The Journey
Christmas Is Full of Journeys

Whether it’s to see family in another state, or a family vacation, or braving a trip to the mall for last-minute shopping, Christmas time is full of people traveling to somewhere. The biblical retelling of the original Christmas events are full of journeys too, from Joseph and Mary traveling to Bethlehem and then to Egypt, to a cast of characters journeying to Bethlehem to see the baby Jesus. And in all of these journeys, both biblical and modern, the trips remind us of the spiritual journey that the baby Jesus calls us to take. It is a journey of discovery, a journey of self-realization, a journey of transformation. And what better time to consider where we are on this spiritual journey than the holiday season, where traveling with the masses is just part of what we do.

Church in Transit
From the Beginning, the Church Has Been Going Places.

The Christian Church certainly exists today in a transitional age. It has a strong presence on every continent, and a reasonable presence in just about every country. The church is more multiethnic, multicultural, and multilingual than it has ever been, and those demographics continue to expand. All of this makes the early church in Acts a good model for the contemporary church. It too was a church that was going places, exemplified in large part by the Apostle Paul’s missionary work. The church was expanding to new people, who spoke different languages. It was venturing into new territory, and that growth brought about new challenges. Like the Acts church, we want UBC to be a church that is going places, a church that is moving the work of God forward. We are not content to sit still and rest on the past. Join us for this series as we study Acts 13-28, the missionary journeys of Paul, and the early church on the first few of its many exciting advancements.

Double Agents
Representing God In a Pluralistic Age

How should Christians engage a semi-Christian environment? That would be a culture that knows a lot about the Bible and Christian beliefs, shares some of them, but is only marginally(if at all) faithful and generally open to modifications, distortions, and the like. That would be the people we are called to serve and called to reach with the story of salvation in Christ. How do we best strategize for this mission? While the ministries of Elijah and Elisha took place prior to Jesus’s coming, their circumstances were strangely similar. They were called to reach a people marginally faithful to the Lord and more than willing to add new and sundry gods with their forms of worship to the mix. From their examples we can learn a lot about being God’s agents in a world of hostility; agents not just of condemnation, but also of hope, of peace, and of salvation.

Theology and Pop Culture
The Language of Culture

Whether your level of pop media saturation is relatively low or through the roof, you can’t deny that it is a common language spoken by the masses in our country. Whether it be movies, TV, sports, music, books, or games (basically, anything they sell at Barnes & Noble), elements of American culture weave their way into our storytelling. And situated within that culture are elements of a spiritual sort, sometimes placed there intentionally, other times accidentally. Join us as we look at some of the stories being told through modern television series and how they illustrate biblical truths about God, humanity, and our world.

Seeing Through Their Eyes

We’re not always skilled at putting ourselves in other people’s shoes, so to speak; not always observant enough to think about what the world looks like through the eyes of those from vastly different times or places from ourselves. One of the most compelling parts of the Christmas narratives as told in Matthew and Luke is the intriguing cast of characters, all who bring something different to the story. And while they each play a role themselves in the events that transpired long ago, I think they each would have viewed the birth of the Messiah from various vantage points. In our 2012 Advent series, Seeing Through Their Eyes, we’ll take a look at a few of these characters and see how their perspectives on the first Christmas might renew and refresh our own. We hope you’ll join us as we seek to see the nativity of Jesus through their eyes.

Meet the Neighbors 2012
Who is Your Neighbor?

The question was asked of Jesus by an inquiring man who wanted to make sure he had covered his bases in “loving his neighbor.” The answer was probably not what he was expecting. Instead of telling him who his neighbor was, Jesus told him a story about what it meant to be a good neighbor. To love one’s neighbor demanded that he take the initiative in extending mercy to one with whom his path crossed. And while the identity of “the neighbor” can be diverse, Jesus’ story serves to remind the church today that opportunities to be a good neighbor come our way just about every day if we will only open our eyes to see them.

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