Sermons

Current Series

Learning to See Again

Heroes & Villains Part 2
Spiritual Leadership Amid Changing Times
For Good or For Evil?

Superheroes have been around American pop culture for over a century now, but they really are experiencing a golden age lately. They’re showing up en masse at the movie theater, our kids’ Lego toys, books and magazines, billboards and anywhere else we care to look. Why is it that the narrative of the superhero resonates so profoundly within us? When we think about it, every hero’s story (and every villain’s story) is potentially our story. We are a people living at a unique time in history, blessed with incredible resources, including our knowledge, technology, community and possessions. And while those may not seem like superpowers to us, they are definitely powers that we all possess, all the while trying to answer the question, “Will we use our powers for good, or for evil?” The early days of the Israelite monarchy was a day of change for all Israel, and 1 Samuel 1–15 illustrates numerous people of influence who had roles to play. Some, like Hannah and Samuel, used the opportunities presented to them to make lasting differences among the people of God. Others, like the sons of Eli and King Saul, used their positions to serve themselves. Theirs are the stories of heroes and villains, and they challenge us to think about our own story. How will we use the powers with which we’ve been blessed?

Heroes & Villains
Spiritual Leadership Amid Changing Times
For Good or For Evil?

Superheroes have been around American pop culture for over a century now, but they really are experiencing a golden age lately. They’re showing up en masse at the movie theater, our kids’ Lego toys, books and magazines, billboards and anywhere else we care to look. Why is it that the narrative of the superhero resonates so profoundly within us? When we think about it, every hero’s story (and every villain’s story) is potentially our story. We are a people living at a unique time in history, blessed with incredible resources, including our knowledge, technology, community and possessions. And while those may not seem like superpowers to us, they are definitely powers that we all possess, all the while trying to answer the question, “Will we use our powers for good, or for evil?” The early days of the Israelite monarchy was a day of change for all Israel, and 1 Samuel 1–15 illustrates numerous people of influence who had roles to play. Some, like Hannah and Samuel, used the opportunities presented to them to make lasting differences among the people of God. Others, like the sons of Eli and King Saul, used their positions to serve themselves. Theirs are the stories of heroes and villains, and they challenge us to think about our own story. How will we use the powers with which we’ve been blessed?

Life of Prayer
Can We Just Sit and Talk for a While?

If you had the opportunity to meet a king, queen, or president, how do you think the conversation would go? Probably a little bit formal. Or more likely a lot bit formal. You might be hesitant to reveal too much about yourself, would likely choose your words very carefully, and probably wouldn’t linger too long. This is how a lot of people approach prayer. After all, talking to God is not just talking to any king, but talking to the King. A degree of formality is certainly warranted! But what if that same king was also your father? In certain royal settings, that formality would still be respectful and appropriate. But you would also have access to the king, or dad, in more casual and intimate moments where the conversation would look more like conversations we might have with our own parents. This too is a biblical facet of prayer, and one that many people today never experience. If you are a disciple of Jesus, the King of Kings is also your Dad, worthy of all the respect a king deserves, but also desiring all the warmth and familiarity that a father has with his children. 

This is How He Lived
Following THE Way Means Living THIS Way

Before the term “Christian” began to proliferate with regard to those who followed the example of Jesus, the early church simply referred to each other as followers of “the way.” They had seen the way Jesus lived, and they sought to follow his example by living according to the same “way.” As we celebrate our 40th anniversary this year at UBC, and as we practice 40 ways of living the Christian life, we thought we would take 40 weeks to reconsider exactly what living the Christian life should look like. As a starting point for our investigation, we’ll consider the original covenant instructions given to God’s people, the Ten Commandments, and we’ll observe how those ten words served as principles of living for God’s people from the wilderness all the way to the early church and beyond. Far from being “old” laws that no longer apply to the church, we will see that the Commandments represent the simplest explanation of what it means to love God and love your neighbor, as well as a broad enough explanation to potentially speak to every area of the Christian’s life. While specific applications change with time and place, the principles themselves clearly define what it means to follow “the way.” This is what it means to live the Christian life.

This is How We Live - X
Following THE Way Means Living THIS Way

Before the term “Christian” began to proliferate with regard to those who followed the example of Jesus, the early church simply referred to each other as followers of “the way.” They had seen the way Jesus lived, and they sought to follow his example by living according to the same “way.” As we celebrate our 40th anniversary this year at UBC, and as we practice 40 ways of living the Christian life, we thought we would take 40 weeks to reconsider exactly what living the Christian life should look like. As a starting point for our investigation, we’ll consider the original covenant instructions given to God’s people, the Ten Commandments, and we’ll observe how those ten words served as principles of living for God’s people from the wilderness all the way to the early church and beyond. Far from being “old” laws that no longer apply to the church, we will see that the Commandments represent the simplest explanation of what it means to love God and love your neighbor, as well as a broad enough explanation to potentially speak to every area of the Christian’s life. While specific applications change with time and place, the principles themselves clearly define what it means to follow “the way.” This is what it means to live the Christian life.

This is How We Live - IX
Following THE Way Means Living THIS Way

Before the term “Christian” began to proliferate with regard to those who followed the example of Jesus, the early church simply referred to each other as followers of “the way.” They had seen the way Jesus lived, and they sought to follow his example by living according to the same “way.” As we celebrate our 40th anniversary this year at UBC, and as we practice 40 ways of living the Christian life, we thought we would take 40 weeks to reconsider exactly what living the Christian life should look like. As a starting point for our investigation, we’ll consider the original covenant instructions given to God’s people, the Ten Commandments, and we’ll observe how those ten words served as principles of living for God’s people from the wilderness all the way to the early church and beyond. Far from being “old” laws that no longer apply to the church, we will see that the Commandments represent the simplest explanation of what it means to love God and love your neighbor, as well as a broad enough explanation to potentially speak to every area of the Christian’s life. While specific applications change with time and place, the principles themselves clearly define what it means to follow “the way.” This is what it means to live the Christian life.

This is How We Live - VIII
Following THE Way Means Living THIS Way

Before the term “Christian” began to proliferate with regard to those who followed the example of Jesus, the early church simply referred to each other as followers of “the way.” They had seen the way Jesus lived, and they sought to follow his example by living according to the same “way.” As we celebrate our 40th anniversary this year at UBC, and as we practice 40 ways of living the Christian life, we thought we would take 40 weeks to reconsider exactly what living the Christian life should look like. As a starting point for our investigation, we’ll consider the original covenant instructions given to God’s people, the Ten Commandments, and we’ll observe how those ten words served as principles of living for God’s people from the wilderness all the way to the early church and beyond. Far from being “old” laws that no longer apply to the church, we will see that the Commandments represent the simplest explanation of what it means to love God and love your neighbor, as well as a broad enough explanation to potentially speak to every area of the Christian’s life. While specific applications change with time and place, the principles themselves clearly define what it means to follow “the way.” This is what it means to live the Christian life.

This is How We Live - VII
Following THE Way Means Living THIS Way

Before the term “Christian” began to proliferate with regard to those who followed the example of Jesus, the early church simply referred to each other as followers of “the way.” They had seen the way Jesus lived, and they sought to follow his example by living according to the same “way.” As we celebrate our 40th anniversary this year at UBC, and as we practice 40 ways of living the Christian life, we thought we would take 40 weeks to reconsider exactly what living the Christian life should look like. As a starting point for our investigation, we’ll consider the original covenant instructions given to God’s people, the Ten Commandments, and we’ll observe how those ten words served as principles of living for God’s people from the wilderness all the way to the early church and beyond. Far from being “old” laws that no longer apply to the church, we will see that the Commandments represent the simplest explanation of what it means to love God and love your neighbor, as well as a broad enough explanation to potentially speak to every area of the Christian’s life. While specific applications change with time and place, the principles themselves clearly define what it means to follow “the way.” This is what it means to live the Christian life.

This is How We Live - VI
Following THE Way Means Living THIS Way

Before the term “Christian” began to proliferate with regard to those who followed the example of Jesus, the early church simply referred to each other as followers of “the way.” They had seen the way Jesus lived, and they sought to follow his example by living according to the same “way.” As we celebrate our 40th anniversary this year at UBC, and as we practice 40 ways of living the Christian life, we thought we would take 40 weeks to reconsider exactly what living the Christian life should look like. As a starting point for our investigation, we’ll consider the original covenant instructions given to God’s people, the Ten Commandments, and we’ll observe how those ten words served as principles of living for God’s people from the wilderness all the way to the early church and beyond. Far from being “old” laws that no longer apply to the church, we will see that the Commandments represent the simplest explanation of what it means to love God and love your neighbor, as well as a broad enough explanation to potentially speak to every area of the Christian’s life. While specific applications change with time and place, the principles themselves clearly define what it means to follow “the way.” This is what it means to live the Christian life.

This is How We Live - V
Following THE Way Means Living THIS Way

Before the term “Christian” began to proliferate with regard to those who followed the example of Jesus, the early church simply referred to each other as followers of “the way.” They had seen the way Jesus lived, and they sought to follow his example by living according to the same “way.” As we celebrate our 40th anniversary this year at UBC, and as we practice 40 ways of living the Christian life, we thought we would take 40 weeks to reconsider exactly what living the Christian life should look like. As a starting point for our investigation, we’ll consider the original covenant instructions given to God’s people, the Ten Commandments, and we’ll observe how those ten words served as principles of living for God’s people from the wilderness all the way to the early church and beyond. Far from being “old” laws that no longer apply to the church, we will see that the Commandments represent the simplest explanation of what it means to love God and love your neighbor, as well as a broad enough explanation to potentially speak to every area of the Christian’s life. While specific applications change with time and place, the principles themselves clearly define what it means to follow “the way.” This is what it means to live the Christian life.

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